Safe Dance Practice Question 2

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Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Thu May 21, 2015 12:39 pm

Write a post endeavouring to raise awareness to the prevalence of injuries within the dance industry.

Breaking Pointe!! Sad

• Why dancers often exceed their limitations?
• What can happen as a result of this?
• What happens to a dancer’s body if they continue to perform whilst sustaining an injury?
• What factors can predispose a dancer to injury?
• Where does the highest incident of injury occur in a dancer’s body? (Provide a common dance injury example).
• Identifying any healthy/unhealthy practices that affect the safeguarding of our bodies.

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Fri Jun 02, 2017 12:51 pm

Write a post endeavouring to raise awareness to the prevalence of injuries within the dance industry.

Injuries in dancers can be very common especially when they exceed their limitations. If a dancer is pushing themselves to hard or they are doing more then what their body can handle this can result in injury. If you are a dancer and you do experience injury you should follow the RICED method.

R stands for Rest, you have experience an injury, you should Rest to reduce further damage. Avoid as much movement as possible to limit further injury. Don’t put any weight on the injured part of the body.

I is for Ice, after you rest, make sure that you ice the injured area for 20 minutes every 2 hours, and continue to do this treatment for 48-72 hours.

C is for Compression, Apply a compression bandage, covering the injured area as well as the areas above and below the injury. Compression can help to reduce bleeding and swelling.

E is for Elevation, Elevate the injured area to stop bleeding and swelling. You may want to place the injured area on a chair or a pillow for support and comfort.

R is for referral, after you have done all of these steps, report to a professional such as a doctor so that they can give you the diagnoses of your injury.

There are two types of injuries, acute and chronic. An acute injury is an injury that happens suddenly and unexpectedly, some examples of acute injuries are: rolling an ankle, fractures or ligament sprains and cartilage tears in places such as the knee. A chronic injury can also be called overuse injuries, it is an injury that develops slowly and is persistent it is an injury that can be long-lasting, or constantly recurring over time, some symptoms that may tell you that you have a chronic injury are: experiencing pain whenever you dance or do a certain step; swelling in a certain spot after dance and constant aching when you aren’t doing much or not doing anything at all.

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Fri Jun 02, 2017 12:53 pm

Safe dance Practice- Injury.
The most common dance injury is acute injury (instant) or chronic injury (over period of time. Long lasting). A dancer should know their body to be able to prevent injury and dance within their limitations. To prevent injury, a dancer must know their bones, joints and their muscles, to know which ones to engage for certain movement.

It is important for a dancer to strengthen and engage all their muscles equally so that their body is “balanced”. A balanced body is important for alignment, control and precision. Having an “unbalanced” body can lead to soreness, tight muscles or tendons, put stress on joints, and can also pull the skeletal system out of place which then leads to injury. An imbalanced muscle/s can also cause injury to other sections of the body that it is connected to. I.e. if ones’ calf muscle is imbalanced, it can lead injury to the ankle and foot.

Injuries to the soft tissues of the muscles are the most common and recurring type of injury. The use of stretching exercises as part of conditioning can greatly reduce the incidence of this type of injury.

It is important for a dancer to be aware of the many causes of injuries to ensure they do not put themselves in a position where they are susceptible to them. Common causes of injury include: improper warm up/ cool down; not focusing as this can lead to mistakes and acute injury; hazardous movements beyond their capabilities; misalignment because this puts strain on other muscles in the body; incorrect technique; dehydration and poor nutrition; incorrect footwear, clothing, environment (floor surface, ventilation, light and free from obstacles); performing beyond your body’s limitations; previous injury (without rehabilitation)

For successful rehabilitation, it is important that a dancer has their technique analysed by a physiotherapist. Special attention must be made on correcting all the contributing factors that may have led to the injury in the first place, to avoid the same injury coming back when returning to dance. It is also important to maintain your strength during rehabilitation so then your body core and muscles aren’t weakened when returning back to dance.

Prevention:

•Understanding the body’s capabilities and limitations

•Maintenance of correct alignment

•Maintaining the body by conditioning the body effectively

•Replacing lost fluid

•Maintaining a balanced diet

•Developing strength, flexibility and stamina

•Obtaining enough rest

•Ensuring a safe dance environment

•Wearing appropriate footwear and dance wear

•Participating in regular training for technique

If injured, the best safe practice is:

R: rest

I: ice

C: compression

E: elevation

D: doctor

Written by Madison F

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Fri Jun 02, 2017 12:55 pm

Write a post endeavouring to raise awareness to the prevalence of injuries within the Dance Industry

In today’s professional Dance Industry dancers must meet higher standards and requirements to be accepted into certain Companies – even particular dance styles have certain requirements in the professional society. This leads to dancers exceeding their personal limitations and capabilities to meet these requirements and this ideal that their body isn’t naturally capable of.

An example of this is Ballet companies and the style itself; professionally a dancer is required to have what’s known as a ‘flat’ turnout. A ‘flat’ turnout is the rotation of the hips at 180 degree alignment, which is not a very naturally common position as every dancer’s body is different and so is the Acetabulum (hip socket) placement, which can affect your turnout. So therefore many dancers force their turnout, even though many dance teachers counsel their students not too – as long term injuries can result from it.

By forcing an unnatural turnout you are susceptible to many injuries, most likely a chronic injury if it is repeated over and over again. When forcing your turnout you put excessive strain on your ligaments and tendons in the knee and ankle, both the knee and ankle joints are hinge joints and therefore they are not capable of this range of movement (ROM). Not only that but in the long term the joints become weaker and so do your ligaments and tendons which causes instability and rolling of the foot. An injury you can sustain that is caused by this is Tibial Torsion. True turnout comes from hip joint because it is a ball and socket.

It has been proven that you can work on your turnout but as always you must be careful not too over do it! The iliofemoral ligament (anterior) is in front of the hip joint- it connects the ilium to the femur. This ligament prevents over extension of the hip (ROM), by laterally rotating the hip and the ligament is pulled tight- you can improve the ligaments laxity by stretching but you must be very careful to do so and not overstretch it. Another way to improve your turnout is too strengthen the rotator muscles of the hip- by doing exercises like clams, side lunges, single leg Glute Bridge, and quadruped hip extension with knee extension, sidestep and quadruped hip extension with knee bent. By doing this you will definitely improve your turnout if you do these exercises at least once a day, because it will gradually improve the strength of those rotator muscles surrounding the hip.

Another reason why dancers exceed their limitations are that they are encouraged by photos on social media to copy extreme overstretching exercises in order to achieve a pose in which is unnatural to their bodies. Positions like ‘scorpion’ or an ‘over split leg mount’, although it doesn’t stop there once they’ve achieved that they tend to push themselves into or further positions going overboard and are even more at risk of injury. Children as young as ages 11-14 are copying these and having labral tears (tear in the hip joint), back injuries and spikes in the hip. This is because they are pushing their bodies beyond their physical limitations and capabilities, because it may be easy for one individual – it may be very harmful for another. Some poses you can do gradually in time, but another fact is that any particular pose could actually be very unsafe for all dancers. With achieving any pose the fact that you are – particularly young dancers continue to practice it over and over again, when it is too advanced or unsafe it carries an enormous risk of injury and rules them out for a career later on in life.

In both examples the result of injury is susceptible and of high risk. If it isn’t an acute injury (instant), a dancer will definitely gain a chronic (over time due to repetition of overuse of an area that’s injured) injury. By continuing to overuse the area that’s injured you can cause stress fractures (in the bone- if that’s the area affected), weak ankles (sprains and rolling), hip injuries, back injuries, knee injuries (patellar tendonitis) and many more. So if you have acquired an injury make sure to rest and get it checked out so you don’t put yourself at further risk of making it worse.

Certain factors can also predispose a dancer to injury and can increase the risk of gaining one. So understanding potential and harmful risk factors are very important and is great knowledge too possess if you wish to reduce the risk of sustaining an injury. Some of these risk factors are; the style of dance, frequency of classes – rehearsals and/ or performances, the environmental surroundings, duration of training, prior history of injury, the equipment used, poor alignment, faulty technique, anatomical limitations, muscular imbalance and fatigue.

Through dance you constantly face the fact that you could potentially be injured. Due to excessive dance training many injuries occur due to overuse of certain areas in the body. The most common injuries for a dancer are; hip impingements, labral tears, hip bursitis, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, snapping hip syndrome, achilles tendonitis, ankle impingements, patellofermal pain syndrome, ankle sprains, meniscus tears and lumbar spine.

The highest incident of injury usually occurs in the knee; patellofermal pain syndrome is the most common injury for a dancer and this is often a chronic injury, this pain mainly occurs on the front of the knee. This injury occurs due to damage or overuse and wearing down of the cartilage under the kneecap – where your kneecap (patella) meets the thigh bone (femur), which is also known as your ‘patellofermal’ joint. A normal patella normally glides up and down the femoral groove, what’s known as a retro patellar is pressure that is increased if the patella does not glide properly – it travels to one side, rubbing against the femur. This ‘mistrack’ and if repeated overuse causes an increase in the joint forces of the retro patellar – this then leads to joint irritation and pain in the kneecap. Symptoms of this are: abnormality in walking, muscle weakness, stiffness and pain in the knee. Treatment for this is pain relievers, physiotherapy, stretching and you can use a brace or tape it if doing physical activity.

When it comes to safe guarding our bodies there are both healthy and unhealthy practices that can affect this. ‘Healthy and safe’ dance practices aren’t there to ruin a dancer’s artistic and creative fun, they are a set rule of guidelines for a dancer too reduce the risk of severe injury, enhance performance and make you self-aware of your body. The principles of safe dance are substantial as they intertwine with physical, psychological, physiological, anatomical and environmental factors that can impact greatly on the quality and effectiveness of our dancing. With understanding each individual ones of these and applying it to our tasks at hand and ourselves we will expand our knowledge and it will help development.

By understanding effective ways of physiological movement and how you can improve a dancers learn development and make it safer and more productive when; warming up, cooling down, stretching, training and improving flexibility. By understanding your own anatomy, you can see what effects your body in both a positive and a negative way; and addressing the negative effects – knowing your postural anomalies and how it can change due to specific movement and how it can result in the change of your alignment when doing so. By understanding the environment around us and communicating with other dancers can help sustain a positive environment and also knowing your surrounds can contribute to this. These guidelines and principles of safe dance practice are that the dancer must possess knowledge about his/her surrounding, how to effectively minimise the risk of sustaining an injury, respecting other dancers, knowing your limitations and capabilities and not exceeding them, having self-awareness of your body and more. Some unhealthy practices are: exceeding a dancer’s natural physical limitations and capabilities in extreme manners, feeling pressured to meet certain dance ‘ideals’ in the professional industry, if a dancer is in a negative environment it can predispose and lead dancer to vulnerability of injury and more.

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Fri Jun 02, 2017 12:56 pm

Write a response raising awareness to the prevalence of Dance Injuries. Comment on the following:
Most professional dancers begin dancing at the age of five or six, therefore the repetitive practice of movements that require extreme flexibility, strength and endurance make dancer’s the prime candidates for overuse injuries.
Keeping dancers free of injury in an enjoyable environment is key to helping them enjoy dance. Constant training without rest put stress on the body’s ability to adapt and can lead to fatigue, muscle weakness, frequent injury and burnout symptoms vary from person to person but occur mainly in dancer’s whose daily schedules produce and imbalance between physical activity and recovery time. Many dancers set very high standards for themselves and are likely to burnout.
If a dancer is injured early intervention and treatment should be their first place to go, but if no necessary action is taken out on an injury and a dancer continues to dance whilst it will only get worse. Stop if you feel pain, dancing on an injury will lead to permanent damage and could end your dancing life in an instant.
A dancer can be predisposed to an injury in multiple different situations these include an improper warm up and cool down, not focusing when you are in the middle of a dance or warmup, hazardous movements – taking a risky move that you are unaware if you are capable of is not a form of safe dance practice, incorrect technique – If you are doing an incorrect dance technique repetitively this could be dangerous and putting the wrong pressure on a certain muscle or joint in our body are when you are doing it, dehydration and poor nutrition – Eating healthy foods and drinking lots of water is a crucial need in any dancers diet as they use their whole body and mind a dancers brain cannot function properly if it is under nutritional and dehydrated, incorrect footwear and clothing – Proper protection of our feet and body is another crucial step in a dancers life if you are dancing in an outfit or shoe that is too big or unsuitable this could lead to a dancer tripping or slipping and injuring themselves.
The whole spectrum in dance there is little doubt that the majority of injuries are the result of overuse rather than trauma. Dancing injuries tend to occur at the foot, ankle, lower leg, and low back and hip areas. The foot and leg area is a very vulnerable range of injuries these include stress fractures, bruises, sprains and strains these injuries occur with great frequency as a dancer ages.
Healthy and unhealthy practices in a dancers life is something they should be very focused on and to balance a dance life with a social life. If a dancer has a dangerous lifestyle level (this can range from drug and alcohol abuse, emotional or psychological stress and dancing on a previous injury without rehabilitation) these are all extremely risky actions to take if you want to live a healthy life. You should never push yourself into doing a performance if you have an unhealthy lifestyle. A healthy dancer means strong muscles, strong bones and good dancing it is crucial to look after our body if we want our body to look after us in the future it is important to have balance. Eating clean and being hydrated but still balancing a normal eating routine is a great way to boost the safeguarding of our bodies.

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Fri Jun 02, 2017 12:58 pm

Write a response raising awareness to the prevalence of Dance Injuries.

Dancers often exceed their limitations to get higher leaps or to kick their leg higher, when they are out of alignment and no technique is shown. In result of this, it can cause injury. If a dancer continues to dance whilst sustaining an injury it could make the injury worse and more painful, making it harder and longer to recover from the injury. A dancer can be more prone to injury if they do not warm up their body properly before performing. Often, performance dancers will continue to dance whilst they are injured because they don’t want to leave all of their hard work behind for an injury. There are two types of injuries, acute and chronic. Acute injuries are injuries that occur straight away in a part of your body. Chronic injuries are injuries that are formed over a period of time. They may be harder to recover from.

The highest incident of injury to occur on a dancer’s body is strains and sprains in their feet, ankles, knees, hips and lower back. These can be helped by using the RICER method. Firstly, rest your body and stop doing movements, because this could increase bleeding and swelling of the injury. Secondly, put ice on the injury for twenty minutes on and twenty minutes off for the first 24 hours. Next, make sure you compress the injury by bandaging the area firmly. Elevate the area of the injury by putting your leg on a chair or use a sling for arm injuries. If the injury has not shown any improvement, go to the doctor and they may send you to get an x-ray, scan or ultrasound to diagnose the injury and plan treatment for it.

Applying heat can be bad for your injuries and make your injuries more severe. If you have a swollen foot or arm, do not put heat on it, because heat will not sooth it, whereas ice will sooth the inflamed tissue. It is okay to apply a heat treatment if there is no obvious or severe injury, such as stiffness in specific areas or sore muscles.

Personal capabilities and limitations for dancers are often exceeded and this can lead to injuries, therefore we need to know what our body is capable of and what we need to work on in a safe matter to increase our ability of dance. With my body, my hips tilt inwards, therefore making my hip flexors very tight and not very flexible, making certain stretchers very painful and not being able to do high kicks, leaps or the splits. To help with this, when doing straddle stretchers, sitting on a small block helps a lot with stretching my hip flexors, making the stretch worth the time.

Awareness of the prevalence of Dance Injuries is important because knowing your limitations and capabilities will help you understand what will injure your body and other ways around prevention of injury to your body.

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Fri Jun 02, 2017 1:11 pm

SAFE DANCE AWARENESS

Exceeding limitations can lead to extraordinary self-discoveries, you may find you can leap higher or reach a full split but without a correct warm up, cool down, precise technique and alignment in play, Injuries become almost inevitable, there are ways to prevent it however.

It is not uncommon for a dancer to exceed their limitations although knowing them, although it is wise to inform your teacher of your injury. To some dancers, conforming to your limitations is a sign of weakness and makes them feel vulnerable and less appreciated in a group. Without acknowledging your boundaries and continuing to dance, a dancer may permanently injure themselves and put themselves out of dance altogether.

Strength and conditioning is an effective way to prevent all-round injuries whilst building strong muscles, ligaments and tendons, extending one’s flexibility range and maintaining a poise posture.
A smart strength and conditioning program can also prevent osteoporosis. Correctly integrating weight exercises with strengthening promotes strong bones.
A proper strength and conditioning program will train muscles allowing a dancer to lift and properly hold the body upright safely.
Not only good for muscles and bones but also metabolism. Dance increases one’s metabolism helping a dancer to maintain the healthy lifestyle needed.

Some of the most common injuries dancers fall victim to are: hip, ankle, foot and knee, also stress fractures and arthritis later in life. These conditions can all be prevented by using proper alignment, such as equal hips and shoulders; stretching safely, knowing your limitations; precise technique and a thorough warm up and cool down résumé and even non-dance related hazards such as wearing incorrect footwear; not dancing on safe surfaces and even not tying your hair back.

To conclude, there are a lot of factors of dance safety but when all executed well the art of dance is portrayed safely and beautifully.

Written by Molly S.

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Sun Jun 04, 2017 11:03 am

RAISE AWARENESS TREATING INJURIES

REST- when having an injury it would be common sense to stay off your injurie until it has healed. If injurie just occurred make sure you rest and protect the injurie until it has been checked up, or if it’s just throbbing or sore make sure you take a rest and give yourself a break to see if it will stop.

ICE- when an injurie ends up swelling make sure you put ice on it to prevent the swelling form getting larger, it will make it go down. You should apply it for about 10-15 minutes 3 times a day. Make sure only when swelling is gone you can place heat to the injurie. Make sure you use a towel over the heat or cold pack before placing it on the injurie.

COMPRESSION- some injuries may need bandaging to reduce the swelling of the affected area. When applying the bandage, you always make sure that the bandage is not too tight because the can cause numbness, increased pain, or bigger swelling in the injurie.

ELEVATION- make sure that you keep your leg elevated weather it is on a pillow or some other object make sure it is high and rested. If any worse after a while going to the doctor would be the best decision to see if the injury turned out to be worse.

REFFERAL- make sure to report the injured to the supervisor or professional in charge so that they can take further action in getting the help that is required. Once that is done it is important to ring an ambulance if patient is in traumatic pain.

Dancers in fact tend to overdo their limitations to push themselves to become better but doing this can have serious consequences for example over doing a stretch you can damage muscles, joints, ligaments etc. you should take your time to know what you are capable to succeed and get better at want you want to achieve then over doing yourself and end up injured and unable to dance.

Healthy practices to our bodies-

· Increased muscular strength and endurance

· Increased aerobic fitness

· Stronger bones

· Coordination

· Agility and flexibility

· Better social skills

· General wellbeing

Unhealthy practices to our bodies-

· More prone to injurie

· Soreness, feet, back, neck, ankles, knees etc.

· Back issues

· Feet and ankle issues

· Self-doubt

Written by Josephine

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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Sun Jun 04, 2017 11:04 am

Write a post endeavouring to raise awareness to the prevalence of injuries within the dance industry.

Q2 – Write a response raising awareness to the prevalence of Dance Injuries.

Did you know that 80% of dancers experience a disabling injury during their careers? Dancers are often injured due to overstretching, impact (I.e falling/bumping into another dancer), over training or exceeding their limitations. Dancers often exceed their limitations to get their kicks and leaps higher or to get a wider turnout, but while they are doing this they are also exposing themselves to more injuries during their dance training. The most common cause of problems and injuries when exceeding a dancers limitations is a forced turn-out. Many dance injuries can be traced back to an instance, or multiple instances, where a dancer has ignored their safe dance practice and forced their turnout in order to achieve a better/wider turnout. When a dancer forces their turnout they can injure their spine or lower back and as a result of that be forced to stop dancing for a period of time. Although some dancers continue their dance training while sustaining an injury and as a result of this they can cause more problems for themselves and make their injury much more severe.

The highest incidence of injury in a dancer’s body is in the ankles, studies show that incidences of injury to the ankle range from around 27% to 49% of total injuries in ballet, modern and tap dancers, with ballet dancers being most vulnerable to injuries in that area. The ankle sprain is one of the most common acute injuries seen in dancers, many ankle sprains are caused from landing badly after a jump or falling out of a turn. When a dancer sprains their ankle they often hear a pop or they experience a tearing sensation and have immediate pain, swelling usually occurs around the ligaments in the ankle and if the sprain is serious the dancer will feel that their ankle has become unstable. When a dancer is experience an ankle sprain they should follow the PRICE method for the first 48 to 72 hours, the PRICE method involves protection, rest, ice, compression (ankle wrap) and elevation but if the injury.

To prevent any injuries while dancing you should always be aware of your limitations and capabilities because then you will know how far you can go without seriously injuring yourself.



Bibliography

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22390950

http://www.humankinetics.com/excerpts/excerpts/ankle-and-foot-injuries-in-dancers

http://www.contemporary-dance.org/common-dance-injuries.html

http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/features/the-6-main-causes-of-dance-injuries

http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org/STOP/Prevent_Injuries/Dance_Injury_Prevention.aspx


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Re: Safe Dance Practice Question 2

Post by cody.poole on Sun Jun 04, 2017 11:07 am

Dance Injuries

Dance is a very physically demanding art which often requires the body of the dancer to be fit to execute difficult movement but with the how demanding dance is, dancers are more susceptible to injury. Statistics have shown that 80% of dancers experience a disabling injury during their careers and the amount of heavy flexibility, strength and endurance required for dancers to be able to dance, injury is often a very common risk towards their dance career.

Dance injuries vary in different areas of the body but the most common part of the body that is injured occur where the foot/ankle, lower leg, lower back and hip. Injuries are due to overuse, improper warm up, overstretching, performing the wrong exercises or in the wrong sequences, environmental conditions, equipment, history of injury and a dancer’s body alignment or technique are just some of the possible situations that dancers who get injuries faced. It is very important for dancers to understand their own body because if a dancer go over their limits this could hurt them in the long run. Dance opens dancers to injuries but the most common include stress fractures, tendon injuries, sprains and strains which is found mostly be found in older dancers or as they are aging. When facing injury, you should follow the RICED method which means Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation and Doctor. By following this method, you will get the best possible results towards recovery. There are acute which is an injury that happens immediately and chronic which is an injury that lasts long term so you must be careful identifying what type of injury it is. When a dancer is injured they should avoid dancing until they are certain the injury is healed fully but what happens if they dance with the injury? If a dancer does this, they could potentially make the injury worse and more devastating towards their recovery. Depending on the style of dance, you may have injuries involving that style such as if you dance ballet you will be most likely to suffer from ankle injuries like sprains due to high amount on foot work involved in ballet.

In conclusion, dancing causes the possibility of injury and by know the correct safety measures, you should be able to avoid this but it is however very important that the dancer understands their own body and are able to handle the injury the best way they can.

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